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    5 Key Steps to Managing the Tax Risks of your Business Traveler Program

    For many companies, the new workforce norm has shifted to virtual and remote employees. However, for several businesses, there remains a need to have employees working in-person on multiple projects across the country or around the world. Business travel, while still not up to pre-pandemic levels, is making its way back as a standard way of working.

    While typical mobile workforce structures such as permanent and long-term assignments are generally managed through a defined HR or mobility function, management of short-term business travel tends to be less defined. Yet, understanding and actively managing the tax risks of short-term business travelers can greatly reduce costs and a variety of risks for both your organization and business travelers. Therefore, developing a structure to oversee this area is imperative.

    Communicating Tax Matters to Your Mobile and Remote Employees

    Let’s face it, many people find taxes to be intimidating, time consuming, and confusing—why else would so many people procrastinate when it comes to filing their taxes? Then, add in the intricacies when taxpayers are dealing with multiple taxing jurisdictions—due to an international transfer, international assignment, business travel, or even remote work—and the complexities skyrocket. When employees are working outside of their Home location, delivering timely communications can go a long way in managing risks and providing an exceptional employee experience—helping you retain top talent and providing essential duty of care to your workforce. Below, we outline key items you should be discussing with your remote workers, business travelers, and/or international transferees or assignees.

    How to Build a Business Case for Remote Work and Business Travel Services

    As remote work requests continue to roll in and the future of work is one that embraces a mobile workforce, C-suite executives are pushing to offer remote work as a valuable incentive to retain and attract talent. While a drive to offer this employee incentive has already realized advantages for companies, it has also come with many challenges and compliance requirements that still need to be addressed.

    Tips for Handling Traveling Remote Employees and the Future of Business Travel

    As travel is slowly returning worldwide, and remote work is becoming truly remote, the key to having a successful remote workforce policy is to have a plan. Having an approach that essentially lets your employees freely choose where they work puts both the company and the employee at risk. And there are many risks ranging from health, duty of care, employee benefits, and insurance, to more operational aspects such as immigration, tax, payroll withholding, and social security. Below are some guidelines for how you can handle your traveling remote workforce.

    Solving Risk and Compliance Concerns for your Mobile Workforce

    While COVID-19 continues to impact the world of business travel, there are still many companies with mobile workforces. Essential business trips didn’t stop when the pandemic hit for employees who continued to travel due to the nature of their job responsibilities. And in the current world climate, “mobile workforce” now includes remote working, work from anywhere, and commuting—all of which have seen an increase in popularity during the pandemic. While these work situations may be somewhat temporary, there are still tax risks and compliance requirements that need to be addressed.

    Is Business Travel Dead?

    Colleagues, peers, mobility professionals, and even my kids have asked me if COVID-19 means the end of business travel. And over the past two months, the traditional questions being asked have changed from a focus on business travel issues, the need to track business travelers, and how to manage the process, to questions about working through country travel bans, tax exemptions, and the immediate mobility tax risks of employees being in a location they might not have expected to be in. While we don’t have all the answers, we are working through these questions, determining next steps, and creating solutions together that can be used well into the future.